The Old Man And The Sea First Date Of Publication Reflections of the Hanriot Monoplane by Bill King

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Reflections of the Hanriot Monoplane by Bill King

Amidst the roar of radial engines and the spitting of castor oil, the cheers of the bench crowd at Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome on a hot July Saturday announced the pioneers, as the Bleriot XI and Curtiss Model D took care of the passage. field in front of the elevator—based on their grass-hopper reputation. Following the pair was another original design in which the pilot rode passively and his single-bladed propeller was brought to life by adjusting its stability and communicating with its speakers. That pilot, who repeated this tradition for 200 years, was Bill King. And the plane, although at first it looked like the Bleriot predecessor, was actually the Hanriot Monoplane.

Bill, who was first introduced to vintage aviation in 1962 on the advice of his Rhinebeck pilot brother, Richard King, became a mechanic, pilot, instructor, and solo pilot after completing his airframe and powerplant work with private airmen. certificate, referring to the surrounding grass as his “heavenly corner.” Recently asked to share his 25-year vision of integrating humans and machines with Hanriot, he offered some insight.

“The Hanriot at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome is a replica and the date plate says ‘Palen-Hanriot–1911,'” he began. “The first thing you notice is the fuselage. It looks a lot like a speeding bullet. It doesn’t have all the wires that most other airplanes had at the time.”

Instead, its mahogany-ply, boat-like, aerodynamic fuselage makes for a strong, but lightweight structure that eliminates the need for support wires, reduces drag on the plane and forces control to the rest of the plane.

Confirming the Bleriot XI’s original similarity, Bill concluded, “The wings look like they were borrowed from Louis’s Bleriots and are folded in the same way.” Made up of two inches deep and one and a half inches wide, three spars and wire ribs, the wings covered with fabric, around the tip are 30 feet long, seven inches wide, and cover an area of ​​184-square -foot. A steel line attached to the body, the spars are placed at angles to each other, one aft of which is retracted to allow wing-warping actuation. Its low height, of seven inches, or the plane’s height depending on the horizontal, allows for a different, more stable landing time.

The two-part, smooth, cloth-covered horizontal tail, mounted on an inconspicuous surface, has a front part, 9.3-meters long and an entrance, curved, a 2.5-meters-long platform. which, according to Bill, “is very simple. The stand has a spruce spar at the back where the elevators are attached. The front is two meters forward, and two fittings on the fuselage are about two meters forward. A wire or small cable is attached to the end for the spar and fuselage structures. A piece of cloth is laid over the building and the outside is folded down and sewn together to make the kite I used to make as a child. . The cloth is strong and several coats of seal (it).” The horizontal tail is eight feet long.

Originally powered by an eight-cylinder, 40-hp, ENV, mounted on the front of the fuselage and partially supported by A-frame struts, Hanriot, reflecting Bill’s one-hundred-year experience with the machine, now derives from the “50- hp Franklin himself it may have come from a 1938 Piper Cub” and its steering wheel is not covered by any wire. “It’s lighter than the original,” he shared, “so most people who fly the Hanriot find it a little heavy in the tail.”

Based on a unique, three-part, A-frame chassis introduced by Hanriot in 1909, the designers built it as a fuselage mount, where it is attached to a steel frame, with a bottom cable, its two spokes. , air-tired wheels are attached to each end of the axle, which are also placed between vertical reference points. The entire aircraft is suspended on rubber springs fixed to the skids, and its natural design, together with its engine position, provides ample space – so much so, that the tail slide is often unnecessary for taxiing.

According to the December 3, 1910 issue of Flight, “Like everything else in Hanriot’s design, the strength (of its axle) seems to be the most important factor in its construction.”

The figure of the skiff skiff of the plane extends to the top, or the same height, above its body, which runs continuously from the “bow” to the “back” except for a small deep cabin where the pilot seems to be sitting, and a reinforced part immediately behind him supporting his weight and the associated difficulties during his “rise”. The lack of wire, a signature of the design, helps this.

The 26-foot-long monoplane, again according to Flight, was called “simple in design and construction, (but) strong in principle.”

Bill King’s experience on the air about Hanriot began almost XNUMX years ago in his mind. “My first flight was on June 12, 1985,” he said. ‘Cole checked me (out) at practice and I got on (the plane) a couple of times. The first flight was to the north and the plane began to turn to the right, towards the houses of the village. I gave left rudder and pulled hard…on the right stick. Then the plane slowly straightened and landed properly. I realized that the right stick moves back and forth to control the elevator.”

“On subsequent flights,” he continued, “I kept the wings and left stick in place and everything went well.”
Its incorrect placement was due to a lack of familiarity with Hanriot’s tri-axis rule. His left stick, which bends the wings, moves from side to side, pulls the wires which, in turn, twist the wings to create air banks, while the right stick, which moves forward and backward, deflects the elevators that are attached up or down, which does a long service. control. A rubber bulb above the risk ensures low oil level in the tank. A foot-operated switch controls the tilt rudder, allowing the rudder to be adjusted during takeoff and landing as well as in the air.

The experiment got Bill to know him better. He said: “I noticed that the more I focus on keeping the wings, the more the nose lifts when I get off the lift.” “Then I ran a bungee cord down to the bottom of the right stick and attached it to the fuselage, behind the stick.

Self-awareness was at the forefront of his ability to describe and demonstrate Hanriot’s qualities at Old Rhinebeck weekend air shows. “As the season progressed,” he explained, “I was able to show the control system to the crowd. To get speed at takeoff,” he said, “I get the tail as high as I can without the skids touching. This makes the wings more similar to the ground. If I can climb the feet ten or so (in the air), I can show the wings flapping. ) raise the other wing to get the plane back on track.”

Landing the Hanriot, according to Bill, “starts with pressing the ignition button a few times on the left stick. This slows the engine down so the plane can land. When it (i) slows down until I’m sure the wind isn’t blowing the air, I reach over and shut the throttle with my right hand.”

Together, like all the old ships of Old Rhinebeck, but weak, covered with cloth, to the storm and the exercise on the weekend, Hanriot has faced several mistakes in almost ten years since Cole Palen, Mike Lockhart, and Andy. Keefe had first built it in 1974, “a little bit of damage twice,” according to Bill. This first happened in the late 1970s when “Rick Vogt was flying south on the highway,” but when he “pressed the button on the stick to slow down the engine, it kept jerking because of a broken magneto wire or something bad.” change it. He left the right stick to pull the wheel (back) so that it would not work, (but) after doing this, the plane took off and went to the restaurant. While still in the air, Hanriot “passed the approved area with a high-speed engine. He cleared the bushes and the road, then forced it to the crossing. (They) were flat, but difficult … with stones. , long grass, and branches of trees.

For the pilot, the result was a triumph. For the airline, however, that was not the case. “Rich had minor injuries,” Bill thought, but “the fuselage was torn apart in the passenger compartment.

“It was a model meeting weekend,” he recalled, “a big crowd, bright sun, and a strong, steady wind blowing down the road from the north. With a good wind, Hanriot was under control and the plane went smoothly. Now to land. I got it to the ground.” and it seemed too slow (to let me get there) to get there. I wanted to make sure I got the right cable, so I looked to see if I could pull it back. in the air, and the engine was idle.”

“I knew what was going to happen next,” he continued. “All I could think about was the wolves playing. We came down with the sound of chopping wood! The engine was fine and the prop was idle…I knew I had won the Spandau award that year,” said Cole Palen’s award for the challenge.

Like many other Old Rhinebeck aircraft that often needed a long time to repair, refurbish, or rebuild, the damaged plane was “hung on legs with cargo straps” in Bill’s hanger, and its restoration to air life resulted in strengthening and cleaning the air. steel tools before Ken Cassens “made all new, vertical boards for better landing and skid maintenance.”

Perhaps the greatest success of this plane was down to Australia, although today, what kind of aircraft is responsible for the kangaroo hop across the Pacific. “Old Rhinebeck took a Curtiss D Pusher flown by Dan Taylor, a Sopwith Camel flown by Gene DeMarco, and a Hanriot that passed by me” to the Australian International Air Show at Avalon in February 2003. “Fred Murin took his money Fokker triplane. (Because ) was the 100th anniversary of the flight, Boeing and Airbus were there.”

He continued: “I spent the whole week flying the airfields, as there was a lot of flat land near the airfield that could be used (as) a landing ground (as) if needed.” (However), I was warned about one big, gray field that I shouldn’t have landed on. No one would come to get me. It was a permanent place for a water tank!”

Unlike the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome’s limited hop-only section, the current format promised a full view to viewers. On the day of the actual show, Thursday, “we had a gusty wind, but a steady 45 degrees from the direction of the flight crew,” he added. “The grass area … had been reduced a little, so I started to take off about 300 meters from the road, facing the wind. I turned to match (it) When I got to the 5,000 foot line, I had 50 feet and started to turn into the wind of 180 degrees. I tried to maintain a bank angle of 15 degrees (I read that wing. -fighters don’t like much more than this or you can be in trouble), but … the wind was blowing me away from the airport.” Finally able to overcome his strength, he returned to the airport, “where I was able to land safely.”

“After the show (on) Sunday,” he concluded, “we got the planes out and by Monday we had them in boxes ready for the trip home” – “home” meaning the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome, and Bill King’s “little corner”. heaven.” The Hanriot Monoplane, an accessory of his, helped him carry himself for a quarter of a century.

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