The Man Was Like 127 Years Old Coming To America Nature, God, Afterlife, and Death in Emily Dickinson’s Poems

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Nature, God, Afterlife, and Death in Emily Dickinson’s Poems

“That’s all I have to bring today, this is my heart aside, this is my heart, and all the fields, and all the meadows” (33). These are the words of Emily Dickinson, a woman who is revered as one of America’s greatest poets. During his life, he lived a secluded life, but in secret he wrote more than seventeen hundred poems whose success is unmatched. Within her poems, Dickinson developed her own unique style, in which she called upon the use of simple language and childlike innocence to express complex ideas. Such complex concepts were expressed through the use of creation, God, eternity, and death. In all of her poems, Emily Dickinson uses nature, God, life after death and death to convey complex messages or ideas while expressing her thoughts in simple language.

Nature is one thing that favors Dickinson’s poetry as a means of conveying life’s messages. By incorporating familiar aspects of wildlife, such as bumble bees and flowers, he is able to paint a picture that reflects the hopes and anxieties found in everyday life. One such poem begins with the words, “A wounded deer jumps, I heard the hunter say; In this story, Dickinson compares the injured deer to a person who has been hurt emotionally or physically in the past. A wounded deer, which has been shot or wounded before, jumps up as a way to ensure that it does not get hurt again. Like a deer, a person who has been hurt emotionally or physically withdraws unconsciously from being hurt again.

This fear instilled in corrupted people can play out on several levels, from something as simple and physical as a broken limb, to something emotional or spiritual as a broken heart. Dickinson, in simple words and through natural eyes, can clearly explain the concept of heart disease. The second poem says, “God made a little gentian; This poem, written in the original text, emphasizes the idea of ​​individuality for the reader. It warns us not to be like the little blue rose, which tries to become something it is not and is mocked by the weather around it. Dickinson’s message is clear: People should be comfortable with who they are and what they are, and should not want to be something foreign to them. Just as a gentian can be a gentian, so a man can be what he is and what he is, and there is nothing wrong with being himself. In the third poem, Dickinson uses nature to describe life and death. He begins with, “I will tell you how the sun began, – a ribbon on time. Rivers swam in amethyst, stories like squirrels” (104). This first verse is meant to represent birth and the beginning of life. The rising sun is often a familiar symbol of new life, and Dickinson uses it here along with the innocence that a “ribbon in time” provides. Contrasting this stanza, Dickinson wrote in the following essay:

“But the way the sun sets, I don’t know.

It looked like purple

Yellow boys and girls alike

He was riding the whole time

Until he reached the other side

Dominie in gray

Slowly put the evening bars,

And he led the animals.” 105.

The setting sun is used in this context to represent death, the end of life here on earth. This death is further reinforced in the next chapter when the ruler, or religious leader, “set the evening bars, and led the flock away” (105). Authority is the direct likeness of God, leading new recipients of eternal salvation from earth to Heaven.

Another thing that can be recognized in all of Emily Dickinson’s poems is her combination of traditions and unique ideas about God and eternity. A good example of Dickinson’s personality and ability in the field of religion is her poem “Some keep the Sabbath to church”. This interesting work describes how Dickinson, instead of going to Sunday service, kept the Sabbath by staying at home. In another story, he describes his Sunday by saying, “God preaches, a well-known pastor, and the sermon is not long; so instead of going to heaven at last, I’m still going! (110). With simple words and witty humor, Dickinson explains that the word of God does not need to be preached in the chapel, but can be found in every walk of life. God is portrayed as a human and loving being, the opposite of the God of fire and brimstone often preached in the nineteenth century. He also reveals his inner belief that, contrary to what people believed in his day, going to Heaven is not a tedious task of trying not to sin or be a good person, but a journey. “I’m going all this time!” he announces with confidence and joy, as if he has been told by God that there is a place for him in His kingdom. This idea of ​​eternity is a recurring theme in many of Dickinson’s poems. Another passage that reflects Dickinson’s belief in the afterlife says, “This world is not the end; the next stands beyond, unseen, like music, but good, like sounds” (135). There is not an iota of uncertainty to be found anywhere in these lines. “This world is not the end,” says Dickinson. There is life after this world, and though it may be invisible, like music to the eyes, it is a sure and good truth, like a sound to the ears.

As in previous poems where Emily Dickinson asserted her belief that there was indeed an afterlife, another theme found throughout her poems is the questioning of the unknown that comes with life after death. He shows a child-like interest in what the next life will have and how it will compare to the dirt and dust in which his life has been. This interest is most evident in his poem “What is – ‘Paradise’-” which says:

What is “paradise”?

Those who live there –

Are they ‘Farmers’ –

Do they ‘hoe’ –

Does he know this is ‘Amherst’ –

And that – I’m coming – too –

Do they wear ‘new shoes’ – in ‘Eden’ –

It’s always fun – there –

Won’t they yell – when we’re at home –

Or tell God what kind of cross we are” (99)

The first part begins with the question of what is eternity, which is immediately followed by “Who lives there?” This question raises other unanswered questions, about whether there is work in heaven. The next question asked, which says, “Does he know that this is ‘Amherst—and where—I’m coming—too—” refers to the awareness of the heavenly souls. When Heaven arrives, do people realize that they are part of eternal salvation? Do they know about the world they left behind, and if so, do they know which spirits will join them in salvation? With these simple words, most of them two syllables or less, Dickinson is able to ask complex questions whose answers cannot be understood by the human mind. In the second stanza, Dickinson shows the reader her child-like curiosity, which in this case is mixed with her unusual sense of humor. They wonder if Heaven will be happy, which is beautiful because with the thought of Heaven comes visions of eternal happiness; asking such a question about the joy of eternal salvation seems silly. Dickinson follows this question and wonders if the heavenly body is missing its home because of its life on earth. This idea, full of childish innocence, adds another dimension to the poem. After being in Heaven, is it possible for a person to want to return to earth? Do members of the Heaven group yearn for the people, places, and things found in their past lives? These questions, which seem to have no answers, are the basis of Dickinson’s desire to understand the unknowns of life after death.

Finally, death is a part of many of Dickinson’s poems, which are clearly described. For example, one of his poems begins:

“Because I cannot stand Death.”

He kindly stood up to me;

The cart caught but us

It is Immortality.

We walked slowly, they didn’t know how fast,

And I was gone

My work, and my rest too,

Because of his nature” (151).

In the simple, yet vivid picture that Dickinson paints, Death is not portrayed as something evil and evil, but instead is represented as a lover who has just come to claim her. In keeping with the traditions of this time, the day is presided over by the personality of Immortal. In the following section, the vehicle is described as driving slowly and without speed. This corresponds to the absence of time that accompanies death; time that was once precious on earth loses its meaning when entering the afterlife. Along with the lack of time, Dickinson emphasizes how there is no work, so there is no pleasure after life by saying, “And I gave up my work, and my pleasure, for its nature” (151). So out of respect for Death, he withdraws from his work and relaxes and enjoys riding with Death for Immortality. However, the Death of honor of the last poem is very unusual for “I heard the sound of a fly when I died”, which in one such version says, “It is blue, unknown, stumbling, between the light and me; and then the windows. I failed, and I did not see” (132 ).Death in this scene, although at first glance it may seem peaceful, is actually dangerous. Dickinson skillfully uses the fly as a symbol of the terrifying side of death, as flies are often depicted as creatures that feed on decaying flesh. As if naturally attracted to the death of the narrator, the idea of ​​a fly destroying his body is the only thing that stands between the end of his life on Earth and the salvation of light.

Emily Dickinson’s poems use simple words to express complex ideas through nature, God, the afterlife and death. This unique style that he himself created has become synonymous with his name and his poems. Although very few were shared during her lifetime, today Dickinson’s poems represent a woman who combined her talent with a passion for poetry to create some of the greatest works America has ever seen. No one can describe Dickinson’s poetry better than herself, so in conclusion:

“This is my letter to the world,

It was never written for me, –

The simple stories that Nature has told,

It is the greatness of mercy.

His message is delivered

To the right I cannot see;

Because of the love of his sweet brothers,

Judge me with mercy!” 102.

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