How Much Day Sleep Should A 4 Month Old Have Is Too Much Screen Time Bad for Speech and Language Development?

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Is Too Much Screen Time Bad for Speech and Language Development?

This is the 2nd article in the series “The Impact of Technology on Childhood Development.” If you missed the 1st article, it covers the hidden dangers of blue light and digital devices on children’s eyes.

My three and a half year old friend showed signs of delayed speech development. As parents, they did what any concerned parent would do and took him to the pediatrician.

Let me back up and give you details about what they are experiencing.

They have a three and a half year old boy who is a classic ‘sensory book seeker’; he simply can’t get enough of anything and is very delayed in his speech and social skills.

He handles a tablet and cell phone very well as do many of his peers.

At first, I thought it was incredible to watch him wrap his little fingers around the family iPad or his mother’s cell phone, swiping through icons to get to a particularly fun video or “educational” game.

He typed “play” and let out a squeal of delight. After watching the video once or playing the game for a few rounds, he slides back to the main screen to open another app where he watches an episode of a colorful cartoon. Halfway through, it moves on to another game, which involves animated fruits making their way into a character’s stomach.

When they try to take the iPad, they suffer from one heck of a tantrum that threatens to go nuclear; quivering lips, tears, feet kicking the floor, fists clenched and a huge screaming session.

He seems to prefer iPad or smartphone for everything else.

There are times when they are the only thing that will keep him quiet.

He has what appear on the surface to be symptoms of autism, but the autism specialist he was taken to does not want to have him fully evaluated until he is 4 years old. She could already tell their son didn’t exactly match autism. believe that they will be correctly diagnosed if they wait.

Based on their readings, her parents think she may be diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), which affects one in twenty people in the general population and tends to be inherited.

The origin of Sensory Processing Disorder is unknown. Preliminary research and studies suggest that SPD is often inherited.

No one in any family has SPD, and other than very few symptoms, it doesn’t fit the symptom profile.

Another thought is that he has Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS); Symptoms of PPD-NOS include:

• Inappropriate social behavior

• Uneven skill development (motor, sensory, visual-spatial-organizational, cognitive, social, academic, behavioral)

• Poorly developed speech and language comprehension skills

• Difficulty with transition

• Nonverbal and/or verbal communication deficits

• Increased or decreased taste, sight, sound, smell and/or touch sensitivity

• Perseverative (repetitive or ritualistic) behavior (ie, repeatedly opening and closing doors or turning lights on and off).

He is very physically active (especially with his constant physical activity, running and jumping), he does not follow instructions well, which I attribute to lack of discipline, but he is affectionate with his family and his family and makes good eye contact.

He has a big appetite and eats anything put in front of him, he does well in crowds and generally around others as long as he doesn’t have to have direct interaction since his verbal skills and social skills, for example manners are and similarly not developed. . His fine motor skills are okay, not great. He can’t hold a pencil and points like a two-year-old with a crayon.

His verbal skills and social skills are underdeveloped.

He understands a lot more than he lets on. It doesn’t imitate sounds or vocabulary much, if at all.

His parents know that he is cognitively delayed, but it is difficult to determine how late, due to the type of child he is and his lack of discipline in my opinion, his parents have not invested time in developing.

The only word he uses consistently and appropriately is “pop,” and he excitedly points to his grandfather whenever possible. He often babbles, which is baby talk that consists of words but not complete conversational sentences. So, his vocabulary is limited and seems to be what he hears on video games and YouTube. He doesn’t seem to have the concept of putting a word with an image other than what he sees in videos or ‘educational games.’

From all that has been read about sensory seekers, extreme speech delays do not seem to be especially prevalent.

Their son was recently evaluated by an occupational therapist and a speech therapist.

During the evaluations, they were asked how much screen time he had each day. It is calculated that it averages 45 to 60 minutes per day; from what I have observed I believe it is higher and closer to 90 minutes spread throughout the day.

A tablet / iPad / Android or smartphone has replaced a daycare with one in one interaction. We all lead busy lives and a few minutes of rest he allowed seemed harmless, or so they thought.

The speech therapist pointed out the data from a recent study Journal of Pediatrics “Portable screen time is linked to speech delay in young children.” The study “suggests the more time children under 2 spend playing with smartphones, tablets, and other handheld screens, the more likely they are to start talking later.”

“According to the study, 20 percent of children under the age of two spend about 30 minutes a day using screens, which leads to an almost 50 percent increased risk of speech delay.”

This study was completed at the Hospital for Sick Children in Canada by pediatricians who examined screen time and its effects on 900 children between 6 months and two years of age.

The results of the study show that there is a 49% increased chance of speaking late for every 30 minutes more than using a touch screen, whether it is a tablet, iPad, iPhone or Android device.

Think about this for a few moments:

• 10% of US children under the age of 2 used a tablet or smartphone in 2011, the one-year anniversary of the introduction of the iPad.

• In 2013, 40% of children age 2 and under had access to a tablet or smartphone.

• In 2015, 58% of children under the age of two used a tablet or mobile phone.

According to a Nielsen study, more than 70 percent of children under the age of 12 use tablets and iPads. A recent study in the Journal of Pediatrics showed that:

• 20% of 1-year-olds own a tablet.

• 28% of 2-year-olds could navigate a mobile device without assistance.

• 28% of parents say they use a mobile device to get their kids to sleep.

The rate of adoption of tablets, iPads, and smartphones by children under the age of 3 has increased more than 5 times in 4 years with unknown impacts on their cognitive development.

There is little scientific data on the long-term effects of using tablets, iPads, and smartphones; although studies are underway.

Optometrists are seeing a sharp increase in young children with myopia (myopia). The World Health Organization has documented that myopia is growing at an alarming rate worldwide and screen use is a well-accepted factor stemming from the early introduction of handheld devices to children.

Interactive screens such as iPads, tablets, and smartphones are known to disrupt sleep. The blue light emitted by super-sharp displays prevents the release of melatonin, an important sleep hormone, which interferes with the natural rhythms of the body, leading to sleep disorders in both adults and children in their use.

Blue light is harmful because it is the highest energy wavelength of visible light. This energy can also penetrate all the way to the back of the eye, through the natural filters of the eyes, and that’s the problem. Long-term exposure causes damage to the retina.

Currently, there is a great deal of in-depth research on television exposure and children, but little in-depth, long-term research on the impact of interactive screens in smartphones, iPads and Android tablets. Studies are currently underway; however, the jury is still out.

Pediatricians and child development experts agree that while passive screen time in front of a TV or iPad or tablet for a 30-minute session of video games or ‘educational’ games might be fun, it won’t provide a rich learning experience or develop skills fine or coarse motor. And there are developmental and cognitive risks.

Research has confirmed that having a video or television running in the background negatively affects development when a child is engaged in play and learning. This is a distraction from the task at hand and reduces their concentration.

Studies have confirmed that hours of background television reduces child-parent interaction, which puts behind a child’s language development.

This is a big concern: if children are left with screen-based childcare such as tablets, iPads, and smartphones, they are not interacting with their parents and siblings or the real world.

There are only so many hours in a day, and screen time comes at a high price, taking time away from better activities that develop fine and gross motor skills, expand knowledge and skill sets, build social skills and expand verbal language. their abilities.

Children under three need a well-balanced range of activities, from instructional play (math sheets/games, coloring pages, puzzles and games, arts and crafts), time to explore nature, touch and play and physical play and socialization and other siblings and peers as well as adults.

In 2016, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued guidelines on screen time. Prior to this update, the AAP set the overall screen time limit to a maximum of two hours per day in front of the television for children over the age of 2.

The revised AAP guidelines recommend:

• One hour a day for children 2 to 5 years old.

• Parents should supervise and restrict children 6 years and older.

• Children under the age of 18 months should not be allowed any screen time and should not be exposed to any digital media.

o The baby’s brain, eyes and speech are undergoing a phase of rapid growth and development that makes them more vulnerable in front of screens.

Any length of time spent using tablets, iPads or smart phones for entertainment purposes is what the AAP defines as screen time.

As parents we need to remember that we are our children’s primary role models, so our habits are directly and indirectly instilled in our children.

We need to be very aware of our own behavior and that means turning off our smart phones, putting away the tablet or iPad along with the TV and laptop and staying in the here and now with our kids.

Kids can tell when we are always on email we just read on our phone. Not paying attention to them usually makes their behavior worse.

As parents we need to establish a media free time every day and spend that time with our attention 100% focused on our children and engaged with them. Smart phones, iPads, Android tablets or phones are off limits on the table. This is family time. It is the same for all rooms. The rooms are designed for sleeping.

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